Advocating for comprehensive hearing and visual evaluations based on the Moore Auditory-Visual Questionnaire results

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Auditory and Visual Dyslexia

Client’s comprehensive hearing and visual test results supports what I have found through a review of research. Dyslexia affects the auditory and visual processing systems in the brain. Clients experienced either sound intolerance to loud sounds (video) or sound sensitivity to speech (video) creating behavioral characteristics of auditory fatigue with visual processing difficulties.

Brain plasticity research shows individuals benefit from intervention; the brain can change as long as there is brain health. (More videos being developed in 2019, on brain plasticity and dyslexia.)

Testimonial, Leanne (Central Auditory Processing Deficits or Autism Spectrum Disorder?)

My daughter, Leanne, was diagnosed with autism and central auditory processing disorder (CAPD).  We schooled her at home, and even with my background in teaching, it was very difficult.  I would have to fight with her to make her begin her school work.  While teaching her, she would get very irritated and became fatigued very quickly.  Every little noise distracted her.  Every day, our bird would have to be removed from the room, because she could not tolerate its high pitch sounds.  She would cover her ears when exposed to loud noises, like a baby crying in the store or a dog barking.  She avoided social interactions and preferred to stay home by herself.

Testimony-John (Dyslexia)

Year after year, I saw John gradually fall behind in reading comprehension.  He never liked to read even though he passed his phonetics reading program and successfully decoded words, read sentences, and then read whole paragraphs.  However, after each annual achievement test, I saw his scores decrease in the area of reading comprehension, until he was officially behind.

At first, I required John to follow a health program to rid his body of yeast and confirmed that he was yeast-free by a medical practitioner who performed a blood analysis.  Although I felt this was an important part of improving John’s ability to focus,  he continued to struggle.  Thankfully, I was referred to Cheri Moore by a friend who told me how Cheri used brain integration techniques to help smart kids who were doing poorly in school.

Testimony-5 year old Ryan (vestibular, etc…)

After Cheri Moore’s success with helping my older son, I decided to seek her advice regarding Ryan’s unclear speech and lack of attentiveness, despite the fact that he was now in kindergarten.  We thought his speech would improve over time, but after a year, his speech improved very little.  I knew I would need to put Ryan in speech therapy, but decided to first let Cheri evaluate Ryan.  Within her first visit with Ryan, she expressed concern about behaviors that indicated hearing sensitivities.

Middle Ear Infections

Middle Ear Infections: A Discussion of Some Issues

Stephen M. Edelson, Ph.D.
Center for the Study of Autism
Salem, Oregon

Recurrent middle ear infections are quite common in children, estimated to be around 12{77d4898647b49139da30a0a7cc2019467f6d4a05f71893f9a5ca5bcca7b450f1}; and there is increasing evidence that these infections may be even more common in children with developmental disabilities. Several large-scale surveys have shown that ear infections are more frequent in children with developmental delays, autism, and fetal alcohol syndrome. In fact, there is concern that chronic ear infections and/or the treatment of these infections may actually lead to developmental delays. For example, research has shown that those who have had frequent ear infections often suffer a loss of about 13 decibels. Additionally, researchers have found that children with persistent ear infections often have speech and language problems in later years.

Testimony: Leanne

My daughter, Leanne, was diagnosed with autism and central auditory processing disorder (CAPD).  We schooled her at home, and even with my background in teaching, it was very difficult.  I would have to fight with her to make her begin her school work.  While teaching her, she would get very irritated and became fatigued very quickly.  Every little noise distracted her.  Every day, our bird would have to be removed from the room, because she could not tolerate its high pitch sounds.  She would cover her ears when exposed to loud noises, like a baby crying in the store or a dog barking.  She avoided social interactions and preferred to stay home by herself.

A Mother’s Story

Ashylyn did not talk much when she was little, and was shy about interacting with people.  By the time she had finished Kindergarten, I could no longer deny Ashylyn’s difficulties.  When she was eight years old I had her tested and she received the diagnosis of Learning Disabilities with severe auditory processing deficits.  She worked with a wonderful educational therapist for many years; however, she continued to struggle in ways I couldn’t understand nor offer solutions to ease them.